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Federal Reverse Mortgages

FEDERAL REVERSE MORTGAGE:

1. What is a reverse mortgage?

A reverse mortgage is a special type of home loan that lets you convert a portion of the equity in your home into cash. The equity that built up over years of home mortgage payments can be paid to you. But unlike a traditional home equity loan or second mortgage, no repayment is required until the borrower(s) no longer use the home as their principal residence. FHA’s HECM provides these benefits. You can also use a HECM to purchase a primary residence if you are able to use cash on hand to pay the difference between the HECM proceeds and the sales price plus closing costs for the property you are purchasing.

Refinance Home Loan

2. Can I qualify for FHA’s HECM reverse mortgage?

To be eligible for a FHA HECM, the FHA requires that you be a homeowner 62 years of age or older, own your home outright, or have a low mortgage balance that can be paid off at closing with proceeds from the reverse loan, and you must live in the home. You are further required to receive consumer information from an approved HECM counselor prior to obtaining the loan. You can contact the Housing Counseling Clearinghouse on (800) 569-4287 for the name and telephone number of a HUD-approved counseling agency and a list of FHA-approved lenders within your area.

3. Can I apply if I didn’t buy my present house with FHA mortgage insurance?

Yes. It doesn’t matter if you didn’t buy it with an FHA-insured mortgage. Your new FHA HECM will be FHA-insured.

4. What types of homes are eligible?

To be eligible for the FHA HECM, your home must be a single family home or a 1-4 unit home with one unit occupied by the borrower. HUD-approved condominiums and manufactured homes that meet FHA requirements are also eligible. Should I Refinance My Home?

5.

What’s the difference between a reverse mortgage and a bank home equity loan?

With a traditional second mortgage, or a home equity line of credit, you must have sufficient income versus debt ratio to qualify for the loan, and you are required to make monthly mortgage payments. The reverse mortgage is different in that it pays you, and is available regardless of your current income. The amount you can borrow depends on your age, the current interest rate, and the appraised value of your home or FHA’s mortgage limits for your area, whichever is less. Generally, the more valuable your home is, the older you are, the lower the interest, the more you can borrow. You don’t make payments, because the loan is not due as long as the house is your principal residence. Like all homeowners, you still are required to pay your real estate taxes, insurance and other conventional payments like utilities. With an FHA HECM you cannot be foreclosed or forced to vacate your house because you “missed your mortgage payment.”

6.

Can the lender take my home away if I outlive the loan?

No. You do not need to repay the loan as long as you or one of the borrowers continues to live in the house and keeps the taxes and insurance current. You can never owe more than the value of your home at the time you or your heirs sell the home.

7. Will I still have an estate that I can leave to my heirs?

When you sell your home, you or your estate will repay the cash you received from the reverse mortgage plus interest and other fees, to the lender. The remaining equity in your home, if any, belongs to you or to your heirs.

8. How much money can I get from my home?

The amount you can borrow depends on your age, the current interest rate, and the appraised value of your home or FHA’s mortgage limits for your area, whichever is less. Generally, the more valuable your home is, the older you are, the lower the interest, the more you can borrow.

9. Should I use an estate planning service to find a reverse mortgage?

FHA does NOT recommend using any service that charges a fee for referring a borrower to an FHA lender. FHA provides this information free, and HUD-approved housing counseling agencies are available for free or at very low cost, to provide information, counseling, and a free referral to a list of FHA-approved lenders.

10. How do I receive my payments?

You have five options:

  • Tenure – equal monthly payments as long as at least one borrower lives and continues to occupy the property as a principal residence.
  • Term – equal monthly payments for a fixed period of months selected.
  • Line of Credit – unscheduled payments or installments, at times and in amounts of your choosing until the line of credit is exhausted.
  • Modified Tenure – combination of line of credit with monthly payments for as long as you remain in the home.
  • Modified Term – combination of line of credit plus monthly payments for a fixed period of months selected by the borrower.

Refinance Your Loan! Here are Some Ways – Part I

Okay we’ve talked a lot about Refinancing your loan. But how to do it? What are your options? In this first part, we’re going to show you what options you have when it comes to a refinance move. Your home mortgage will go a long way yet. πŸ™‚

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Reverse Mortgages: Refinancing with These

When people think about refinancing a mortgage, they typically think about the existing, conventional loan on their home. But a reverse mortgage — a financial product increasingly popular among older adults — also can be a candidate for refinancing.

First, some background. A reverse mortgage allows homeowners who are 62 or older to borrow against the equity in their property. The proceeds can be taken in the form of a monthly check, lump sum or line of credit. Hence, the word “reverse”: Instead of a homeowner making payments to a bank, for instance, the bank makes payments to the homeowner. The loan is repaid, with interest, when the borrower sells the house, moves or dies. While these loans have their drawbacks (including the potential for some steep fees), more families are using them as a way to produce income without having to dump assets like stocks in a volatile market. To date, sales volume this year is up about 20% from 2002, according to the National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association, a trade group based in Washington.

Why refinance?

By taking advantage of four changes since you first acquired a reverse mortgage — in your age, the value of your home, interest rates and the size of loans insured by the Federal Housing Administration — you might be able to put more cash in your pocketREFINANCING IS AN OPTION WITH REVERSE MORTGAGE…. .

An Argument for Home Mortgage Refinancing

I want to make another case for home refinancing because with the uncertainty of the times, it is a good idea to always know what kind of options you may have when it comes to financing. One of these options may be to take advantage of your home equity through refinancing.

Refinancing?

Home mortgage refinancing means taking out a new loan with a new set of conditions, terms and interest rate and uses it to pay off an existing mortgage. This service is usually offered by a lot of financial institutions, and your current mortgagor may also offer this. A best way to go is to research aggressively for offerings that will give you the best possible interest rate.

Advantages of a Home Mortgage Refinance

Why should you consider refinancing? Could there be any benefit? Yes there are several! Here are some:

(1) Lower monthly payments – you achieve this by extending the terms of your loan. By taking your existing 10 year loan and refinancing this into a 30 year term, you can lower your monthly payments considerably, thereby increasing the cash that you have at the end of each month which you can use for more important causes.

(2) Lower interest rates – with the current credit crunch, loans may be harder to come by, but if you can do it, you can take advantage of such historically low home mortgage interest rates now available in the market.

(3) Instant Cash – Yes, you can get a nice lump of cash by refinancing and applying for a loan larger than what your current mortgage owes. Of course, this is still money you owe, so it would be smart to put this to good use, like renovating your property.

(4) Shorter mortgage – If you have some extra money to spend and you’re not comfortable with having such a long-term, you can use refinancing to take out a shorter-term loan and at the same time take advantage of the lower interest rates that these loans offer.

Of course, refinancing your existing mortgage is not without its disadvantages or cost. We will tackle this more in a later feature.

Take Advantage of Cheap Refinance Mortgage Rates

A small consolation of the mortgage crisis are the depressed refinance mortgage rates that are now available. These historically low rates make refinancing a very lucrative option for a lot of people, for extra money to spend or to save. But before you make a move take advantage of cheap refinance mortgage rates, you have to make sure to do the math and make sure that you don’t end up spending a lot when trying to close a refinancing deal. Here are some tips

Continue reading Take Advantage of Cheap Refinance Mortgage Rates

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Read the news carefully today. You never know what you're gonna get. For recommended reading materials on mortgages and refinance aspects and how to fix your deeds or just plain news on real estate, check out the new york times online. It's a very good source of information.